Pacific Cod

The Pacific Cod, an important commercial food species, also known as Gadus macrocephalus, has three separate dorsal fins, and the catfish-like whiskers on its lower jaw. It is relatively similar to the Atlantic cod. Found mainly along the continental shelf and upper slopes with a range around the rim of the North Pacific Ocean, from the Yellow Sea to the Bering Strait, along the Aleutian Islands, and south to about Los Angeles, down to the depths of 900 meters (~ 3000 feet).

Pacific cod has a higher moisture content than Atlantic cod and for that reason is not considered as good for breaded and battered fried applications. In other applications Pacific cod is a substitute for Atlantic cod and lingcod.

Pacific cod females grow significantly faster in the Bering Sea than in the Gulf of Alaska.  Males reach a smaller maximum length in the Gulf of Alaska than females; in contrast, Bering Sea males reach a similar maximum length as females.  Pacific cod are highly fecund and can produce up to 5.7 million ova each year.

Managed under two Fishery Management Plans: one for the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands region and the other for the Gulf of Alaska region. The Fishery Management Plans control the fishery through permits and limited entry, catch quotas, gear restrictions, closed waters, seasons, bycatch limits and rates, and other measures.

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Key Figures

2013

FOUNDATION YEAR

5

OFFICES IN OPERATION
(Singapore, Korea, Japan, China, Germany)
Trading Volume

250,000

MTS OF FISH
2015 Revenue

205

MILLION
(USD)
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